Monday, January 14, 2013

Wireless Access Points

Wireless Access Points

In computer networking, a wireless access point (AP) is a device that allows wireless devices to connect to a wired network using Wi-Fi, or related standards. The AP usually connects to a router (via a wired network) if it's a standalone device, or is part of a router itself.

Prior to wireless networks, setting up a computer network in a business, home or school often required running many cables through walls and ceilings in order to deliver network access to all of the network-enabled devices in the building. With the creation of the wireless Access Point (AP), network users are now able to add devices that access the network with few or no cables. A WAP normally connects directly to a wired Ethernet connection and the AP then provides wireless connections using radio frequency links for other devices to utilize that wired connection. Most APs support the connection of multiple wireless devices to one wired connection.

A typical corporate use involves attaching several APs to a wired network and then providing wireless access to the office LAN. The wireless access points are managed by a WLAN Controller which handles automatic adjustments to RF power, channels, authentication, and security. Further, controllers can be combined to form a wireless mobility group to allow inter-controller roaming. The controllers can be part of a mobility domain to allow clients access throughout large or regional office locations. This saves the clients time and administrators overhead because it can automatically re-associate or re-authenticate.

For wireless access points we prefer to use Cisco Business Class WAPs.  Learn more.


Post a Comment

Twitter Delicious Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Favorites More